Your Career Matters

Your Career Matters

First Responders & Public Employees

When employment issues arise, call the attorney who has over 20 years’ experience fighting for first responders and employee rights.

Michael has served the Bay Area in law enforcement since 1992 as a deputy sheriff, police officer, lieutenant, and an Assistant State Attorney. As a public employee, Michael understands the importance of ensuring that all public employees receive due process and that their employment rights are not violated.

Previously, Michael was General Counsel and Executive Director of a police union for over 13 years. During his years with the union, he represented nearly 1,000 public employees with disciplinary and legal issues regarding their employment. He also provided counseling to hundreds more for personal matters that impacted their jobs and personal life.

Article 1, Section 6 of the Florida Constitution states Florida is a “right to work” state. This means joining a union is optional for employees, not mandated by state law, unlike other states that mandate union membership. So, when you elect to join a union, that union should cater to all your employment needs. A union should offer all its members the best and most experienced labor and employment law attorneys to fight for you. Therefore, the quality of legal representation offered by a union should not be based on what agency you work for, your popularity amongst peers, and surely not based on any other factors that are not relevant to your employment issues.

During any on or off-duty incident, every minute, and every statement you make may be used against you criminally to arrest you or administratively to terminate you. Do not face work issues alone! If you’re involved in a any incident, shooting, car accident, use of force, or any other on or off-duty situation, you need an attorney that can be on scene with you immediately. Protecting your career and your rights is our priority. Michael is available 24/7 and has unmatched experience when helping you face allegations of wrongdoing, misconduct or policy violations.

Michael’s experience gives him the knowledge and skill set needed for interpreting and applying collective bargaining agreements and employer policies to your benefit. At KLF, we take all employment matters seriously. We address each case based on merit and believe in justice for not just the employer, but also for the employee!

Call the firm that takes pride in protecting, serving, and honoring those who protect us!

Policy Violation/ Misconduct

Employers may fire employees for just about any reason, including company policy violations. As a result, an employee breach of the implied contract in the form of policy violation, might constitute good cause for the employer to fire the employee.

Wrongful Termination

A situation in which an employee’s contract of employment has been terminated by the employer, where the termination breaches one or more terms of the contract of employment, or a statute provision or rule in employment law.

Internal or External Investigation

If you are accused of law-breaking and/or professional misconduct attributed to an on or off duty incident, seek legal representation. Never try to handle it alone.

Loudermill Hearings (known as pre-disciplinary or pre termination hearing)

The term stems from Loudermill v. Cleveland Board of Education, in which the United States Supreme Court held that non-probationary civil servants had a property right to continued employment and such employment could not be denied to employees unless they were given an opportunity to hear and respond to the charges against them prior to being deprived of continued employment.

Hostile Work Environment

  • Obstruction of someone’s movements, such as blocking them from leaving their office or cubicle or workspace.
  • Offensive, sexual, racist, or otherwise inappropriate joking, communication or advances.
  • Discussion of sexual activities, even if it’s not related to the people in the conversation.
  • Comments about the physical appearance of others.
  • Displays of a sexual nature, including things like posters, pictures, or calendars.
  • Racist or other discriminatory behavior, including the use of slurs or other offensive terms.
  • Frequent mocking, teasing, or otherwise inappropriate actions toward someone on the basis of some protected characteristic, such as race, gender, or religion.
  • Any form of unwelcome touching, even hugging.
  • Staring, leering, or otherwise looking at someone suggestively.
  • Any other behavior that is demeaning or threatening.

Disciplinary and Grievance Appeals

A meeting that aims to address and resolve any grievance raised by an employee. There is limited time to file such a request, usually somewhere between 5 – 30 days depending on the agency. Whether your employer is bound to accept a timely appeal notice to Human Resources, the employer, arbitration or Division of Administrative Hearing, (also known as “Steps”) once that time has expired, there is usually nothing that can be done to try and overturn your discipline. Therefore, to preserve your right to challenge the discipline you received, do not delay! Call KLF today!

Retaliation

Retaliation occurs when an employer takes an adverse action against an employee for engaging in or exercising their rights that are protected under the law. Common activities that may incite retaliation include the following:

  • Refusing to commit illegal acts despite your employer’s direction or request to do so.
  • Requesting or taking a leave of absence under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).
  • Filing a claim against your employer with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO).
  • Complaining to your employer about workplace discrimination or harassment.
  • Whistleblowing against your employer in an effort to thwart illegal or fraudulent practices.
  • Filing for workers’ compensation benefits.
  • Participating as a witness in an EEOC or any other legal case against your employer.

Policy Violation/ Misconduct

Employers may fire employees for just about any reason, including company policy violations. As a result, an employee breach of the implied contract in the form of policy violation, might constitute good cause for the employer to fire the employee.

Wrongful Termination

A situation in which an employee’s contract of employment has been terminated by the employer, where the termination breaches one or more terms of the contract of employment, or a statute provision or rule in employment law.

Internal or External Investigation

If you are accused of law-breaking and/or professional misconduct attributed to an on or off duty incident, seek legal representation. Never try to handle it alone.

Loudermill Hearings (known as pre-disciplinary or pre termination hearing)

The term stems from Loudermill v. Cleveland Board of Education, in which the United States Supreme Court held that non-probationary civil servants had a property right to continued employment and such employment could not be denied to employees unless they were given an opportunity to hear and respond to the charges against them prior to being deprived of continued employment.

Hostile Work Environment

  • Obstruction of someone’s movements, such as blocking them from leaving their office or cubicle or workspace.
  • Offensive, sexual, racist, or otherwise inappropriate joking, communication or advances.
  • Discussion of sexual activities, even if it’s not related to the people in the conversation.
  • Comments about the physical appearance of others.
  • Displays of a sexual nature, including things like posters, pictures, or calendars.
  • Racist or other discriminatory behavior, including the use of slurs or other offensive terms.
  • Frequent mocking, teasing, or otherwise inappropriate actions toward someone on the basis of some protected characteristic, such as race, gender, or religion.
  • Any form of unwelcome touching, even hugging.
  • Staring, leering, or otherwise looking at someone suggestively.
  • Any other behavior that is demeaning or threatening.

Disciplinary and Grievance Appeals

A meeting that aims to address and resolve any grievance raised by an employee. There is limited time to file such a request, usually somewhere between 5 – 30 days depending on the agency. Whether your employer is bound to accept a timely appeal notice to Human Resources, the employer, arbitration or Division of Administrative Hearing, (also known as “Steps”) once that time has expired, there is usually nothing that can be done to try and overturn your discipline. Therefore, to preserve your right to challenge the discipline you received, do not delay! Call KLF today!

Retaliation

Retaliation occurs when an employer takes an adverse action against an employee for engaging in or exercising their rights that are protected under the law. Common activities that may incite retaliation include the following:

  • Refusing to commit illegal acts despite your employer’s direction or request to do so.
  • Requesting or taking a leave of absence under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).
  • Filing a claim against your employer with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO).
  • Complaining to your employer about workplace discrimination or harassment.
  • Whistleblowing against your employer in an effort to thwart illegal or fraudulent practices.
  • Filing for workers’ compensation benefits.
  • Participating as a witness in an EEOC or any other legal case against your employer.

Policy Violation/ Misconduct

Employers may fire employees for just about any reason, including company policy violations. As a result, an employee breach of the implied contract in the form of policy violation, might constitute good cause for the employer to fire the employee.

Wrongful Termination

A situation in which an employee’s contract of employment has been terminated by the employer, where the termination breaches one or more terms of the contract of employment, or a statute provision or rule in employment law.

Internal or External Investigation

A situation in which an employee’s contract of employment has been terminated by the employer, where the termination breaches one or more terms of the contract of employment, or a statute provision or rule in employment law.

Loudermill Hearings (known as pre-disciplinary or pre termination hearing)

The term stems from Loudermill v. Cleveland Board of Education, in which the United States Supreme Court held that non-probationary civil servants had a property right to continued employment and such employment could not be denied to employees unless they were given an opportunity to hear and respond to the charges against them prior to being deprived of continued employment.

Hostile Work Environment

  • Obstruction of someone’s movements, such as blocking them from leaving their office or cubicle or workspace.
  • Offensive, sexual, racist, or otherwise inappropriate joking, communication or advances.
  • Discussion of sexual activities, even if it’s not related to the people in the conversation.
  • Comments about the physical appearance of others.
  • Displays of a sexual nature, including things like posters, pictures, or calendars.
  • Racist or other discriminatory behavior, including the use of slurs or other offensive terms.
  • Frequent mocking, teasing, or otherwise inappropriate actions toward someone on the basis of some protected characteristic, such as race, gender, or religion.
  • Any form of unwelcome touching, even hugging.
  • Staring, leering, or otherwise looking at someone suggestively.
  • Any other behavior that is demeaning or threatening.

Disciplinary & Grievance Appeals

A meeting that aims to address and resolve any grievance raised by an employee. There is limited time to file such a request, usually somewhere between 5 – 30 days depending on the agency. Whether your employer is bound to accept a timely appeal notice to Human Resources, the employer, arbitration or Division of Administrative Hearing, (also known as “Steps”) once that time has expired, there is usually nothing that can be done to try and overturn your discipline. Therefore, to preserve your right to challenge the discipline you received, do not delay! Call KLF today!

Retaliation

Retaliation occurs when an employer takes an adverse action against an employee for engaging in or exercising their rights that are protected under the law. Common activities that may incite retaliation include the following:

 

  • Refusing to commit illegal acts despite your employer’s direction or request to do so.
  • Requesting or taking a leave of absence under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).
  • Filing a claim against your employer with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO).
  • Complaining to your employer about workplace discrimination or harassment.
  • Whistleblowing against your employer in an effort to thwart illegal or fraudulent practices.
  • Filing for workers’ compensation benefits.
  • Participating as a witness in an EEOC or any other legal case against your employer.

Your time to take legal recourse may be limited by Florida Statute, agency policy or collective bargaining agreement.

Time matters! Don’t delay, schedule your consultation today. Call us today at 813-879-2222 or email office@krohnlawfirm.com. We look forward to helping you.

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